About the Author 

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AMAZON.COM AUTHOR PAGE

The Micro-Bio

Tanya Lee Stone is best known for telling little-known or unknown stories of women and people of color. She writes MG/YA narrative nonfiction such as Almost Astronauts and Courage Has No Color, and nonfiction picture books such as Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? and The House that Jane Built. Her work has been recognized by the NAACP Image Award, Robert F. Sibert Medal, Golden Kite Award, Bank Street Flora Straus Steiglitz Award, Jane Addams Honor, YALSA Nonfiction Finalist, Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, NPR Best Books, and NCTE Orbis Pictus Honors. She is also the author of the YA verse novel, A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl, which was a Top Ten Banned Book. Stone studied English at Oberlin College, later earned a Masters Degree, and was an editor of children's nonfiction for many years before becoming a writer. She teaches writing at Champlain College. Forthcoming books include Girl Rising, A Story of War, A Story of Peace, and The Countess and the Computer

You can find her on Facebook or Twitter

The Mini-Bio

Tanya Lee Stone is best known for telling little-known or unknown stories of women and people of color. She writes MG/YA narrative nonfiction such as Almost Astronauts, The Good, the Bad, and the Barbie, and Courage Has No Color, and nonfiction picture books such as Elizabeth Leads the Way, Sandy's Circus, Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? and The House that Jane Built. Her work has been recognized by the NAACP Image Award, Robert F. Sibert Medal, Golden Kite Award, Bank Street Flora Straus Steiglitz Award, Jane Addams Honor, YALSA Nonfiction Finalist, Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, NPR Best Books, and NCTE Orbis Pictus Honors. She is also the author of the YA verse novel, A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl, which was a Top Ten Banned Book. 

Stone grew up in a house of books. She studied English at Oberlin College (and Music at Oberlin Conservatory.). After graduation she moved to New York, and was  an editor of children's nonfiction for many years. During some of those years, she also earned a Masters Degree. But when she got her chance to write her first book, she was hooked. This award-winning author has written more than 100 books for young readers. Forthcoming titles include Girl Rising (Wendy Lamb/Random House), The Countess and the Computer (Holt), Do Not Collect $200: The True Story about How the World's Favorite Game was Invented (Holt) and A Story of War, A Story of Peace (Candlewick). 

Tanya has a Facebook page and you can find her on Twitter. She teaches writing at Champlain College. 

The Full-Length Bio

Like many writers, Tanya Lee Stone has been making up stories since she was a kid and wrote her first series, Henry the Happy House. She even drew the (horrible) illustrations to go with it. It's a mystery why nobody wanted to publish it! As a high schooler, Tanya went to performing arts high school as a music major. Her writing improved when she studied English at Oberlin College (and Music at Oberlin Conservatory). After graduation she moved to New York to be an editor.

Stone was an editor of children's books for many years. During some of those years, she also earned a Masters Degree in Science Education and learned all about seals and sea lions. (If you ask, she might tell you about the time she climbed into a harbor seal tank with thigh-high rubber boots to give the seals their shots). She has also traveled all over the world, hopping with kangaroos in Australia, eating the best caviar ever in Russia, and living in England for awhile where she studied British literature. When Stone moved to Vermont and got her chance to write her first book, she got hooked on stories all over again.

This award-winning author has written more than 100 books for young readers. She has written books about animals, nature, science, history, and biography. She also writes poetry and fiction. Stone's first young adult novel, A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl (Wendy Lamb/Random House) received honors from the New York Public Library, Texas Tayshas State Reading List, School Library Journal, the ALA, Maryland Best Books, and the Kentucky Bluegrass Master Award List. Her award-winning picture books include Elizabeth Leads the Way (Holt), Sandy's Circus (Viking), Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?! (Holt), and The House That Jane Built (Holt). Her Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream won an NCTE Orbis Pictus Honor, Jane Addams Honor, YALSA Nonfiction Finalist, Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, the Bank Street Flora Straus Steiglitz Award, and the Robert F. Sibert Medal. The Good, the Bad, and the Barbie won SCBWI's Golden Kite Award. Courage Has No Color was the recipient of the 2014 NAACP Image Award. Many of the stories she now finds herself drawn to deal with themes of strong women and empowering girls, or little-known episodes in American history. 

Stone is a member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the Authors Guild, PEN American Center, ALAN (The Assembly on Literature for Adolescents), and the National Council Against Censorship. She has been a featured speaker at the Texas Book Festival, the New England Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the Rochester Book Festival, the Connecticut Reading Association, the Vermont League of Writers, National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the International Reading Association (IRA), the American Library Association (ALA), as well as multiple schools and libraries. She is the Co-director of Kindling Words, an annual retreat for published children's book authors and illustrators. Stone also writes articles and reviews and has been published in VOYA, School Library Journal, Horn Book, and the New York Times. She teaches writing at Champlain College and has two fabulous kids.

You can find the author at Facebook or on Twitter

Want to know more? Okay, it's a little-known fact that:

  • Tanya has a passion for chocolate-covered pretzels & chocolate salted caramels.
  • Francis Crick once slept in her bed (she was not in it at the time).
  • Mandy Patinkin once showed her his Inigo Montoya sword.
  • She hates the word "tasty." Don't say it, especially when out to dinner with her. Appetite-gone.
  • Like Aviva in BAD BOY, Tanya was a Criss-Crosser in high school. She likes to think it's because she was irresistibly popular, but really it was because she spent half the time at MHS and half the time at performing arts high school--so nobody had time to get sick of her!
  • One of her favorite sounds is an orchestra warming up before a show.
  • She likes winter because she gets to wear her favorite purple (faux) leopard coat. Well, duh! Who ever heard of a purple leopard!